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Thursday, January 29, 2009

Most Say Tax Cuts Always Better Than Increased Spending

Irrespective of the mainstream media efforts to help force the Messiah's "porkulous" package down our throats, most Americans think that tax cuts, not government spending, are the best option for rebounding our economy. In a recent Rasmussen Report, 53% agreed with the following statement:

"It’s always better to cut taxes than to increase government spending because taxpayers, not bureaucrats, are the best judges of how to spend their money."

Only 24% disagreed with the above statement, while just 22% were undecided.

Most Say Tax Cuts Always Better Than Increased Spending
RASMUSSEN REPORTS
Wednesday, January 28, 2009

Paul Krugman, last year's winner of the Nobel Prize for economics and a regular columnist for the New York Times, recently wrote that you should “write off anyone who asserts that it’s always better to cut taxes than to increase government spending because taxpayers, not bureaucrats, are the best judges of how to spend their money.”

If you follow that advice, you’ll be writing off a majority of Americans. The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey found that 53% say that it’s always better to cut taxes. Only 24% share Krugman’s views.

Republicans overwhelmingly say it’s always better to cut taxes, and so do 50% of those not affiliated with either major party. Twenty-three percent (23%) of unaffiliateds take the opposite view and agree with Krugman.

Democrats are evenly divided—38% say tax cuts are always better while 34% disagree.

Krugman was recently named the most influential liberal in the media. In making that selection, Forbes.com noted that Krugman’s “prose is as pungent as his academic credentials are impeccable. Last year's Nobel in economics was widely seen as a vindication of his politics.”

Clearly, his New York Times column was based on his convictions rather than his sense of public opinion, and his purpose in writing is to persuade, not report. The survey data simply highlights how much persuading he has ahead of him.

It also should be noted that Krugman’s assertions are no more out of synch with public opinion than the Republican presidential candidate John McCain's assertion last fall that the economy was “fundamentally sound.”

Krugman’s views are a bit more aligned with public opinion when he asserts that “public spending rather than tax cuts should be the core of any stimulus plan.” On this point, the public is evenly divided--34% agree, 34% disagree, and 32% are not sure.

By a 47% to 21% margin, Democrats agree with Krugman on that point. However, Republicans and unaffiliated voters take the opposite view.

While overall public opinion is divided on that question, there is less public support for another Krugman claim. The columnist wrote that “it’s clear that when it comes to economic stimulus, public spending provides much more bang for the buck than tax cuts.” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi echoed that view on ABC’s This Week on Sunday when she said, “There is more bang for the buck by investing in food stamps and in unemployment insurance than in any tax cut.”

Thirty-one percent (31%) agree with Krugman and Pelosi that “public spending provides much more bang for the buck than tax cuts.” Forty-two percent (42%) disagree.

On this point, Democrats once again strongly agree with the columnist—44% share his view and 17% do not. However, unaffiliateds disagree with Krugman by a 45% to 24% margin, and Republicans are even more likely to disagree.

On all the questions surveyed, voters under 30 are more likely than their elders to agree with Krugman.

A separate survey released recently found that 57% of voters nationwide believe tax cuts are good for the economy Only 17% disagree.

See survey questions and toplines. Crosstabs are available to Premium Members only.
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